biological sounds:

CUSK eel 

The sound of a cusk eel is similar to a high-pitched clicking. You can see it in the audio waveform picture as spikes at two seconds, four seconds, eight seconds, and fourteen seconds

Recorded August 14, 2007 at 8:30PM off of Pier 40 (west end of finger pier)


Oyster Toadfish

A toadfish makes a sound similar to a low-pitched honking. The male toadfish vibrates the swim bladder to produce this mating call. You can see it in the spectrograph pictured as the high intensity white patches at the bottom of the graph. The upper region of the graph is black because those frequencies have been filtered out to make the low range easier to hear.

Recorded July, 2006 at Bay Ridge, Brooklyn


More Cusk Eels

The rapid clicking sound is a recording of a Cusk Eel. You can see on the waveform how the volume of the call varies over time. On the spectrograph at right the high intensity bright yellow color on the graph shows that the main frequencies of this call are 1500hz and 2500hz (which is similar to where much of the human voice is concentrated). The dark areas of the graph are the background noise the researcher has filtered to aid us in hearing this particular sound.

Recorded August 21, 2007 at 8:15PM off of Pier 40 (west end of finger pier)


Toadfish and Cusk eels

This recording contains several examples of both Toadfish and Cusk Eel calls. Toadfish calls are low pitched hooting sounds that are loud and close up at the beginning of the recording, and also seven, twelve, and twenty two seconds in. There is an overlapping softer call, from a toadfish in the distance. It can be heard at five, seventeen, and twenty seconds in.
The Cusk Eel call is similar to a high-pitched rapid clicking, and each call lasts several second. The beginning of these calls can be heard three, eleven, and nineteen seconds in.
You can see all these calls as spikes in the audio waveform and regions of high intensity in the spectrograph at right.

Recorded July 17, 2007 at 8:15PM off of Pier 40 (west end of finger pier)


Tweeting

This recording is of an unidentified tweeting sound heard off of Pier 40. Visually it is shown as spikes on the audio waveform pictured, and as high intensity yellow regions in the spectrograph at right. The regions of black on the spectrograph are due to those frequencies that have been filtered out to aid us in hearing the frequencies containing the unknown sound.

Recorded July 17, 2007 at 8:55PM off of Pier 40 (west end of finger pier)


honking

This recording is of an unidentified honking sound. You can hear the noise at eight seconds into the recording. On the waveform it is shown visually as a large spike of volume. On the spectrograph it appears as a high intensity region of white reaching from 50 to 1000 hertz.

Recorded August 7, 2007 at 9:00PM off of Pier 40 (west end of finger pier)


Sonar

What is this sound, an engine? A strange creature? A man made noise? We can tell from the spectrogram that the sound is focused in the five hundred to one thousand hz frequency range. The waveform shows the way the sound cycles in amplitude (loudness) very quickly in a repetitive fashion. When a sound has a unique frequency and amplitude signature, this signature can be used to help us find it again and possibly identify it.

Recorded July 5, 2007 at 4:45PM off of Pier 40 (west end of finger pier)